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Many people enjoy a pumpkin patch each year, but not everyone grows their own pumpkins. Those who are looking to make pies or find awesome decor for the fall season will definitely want to consider adding the squash to their gardens.

It’s also a great way for parents to successfully introduce gardening to their children. Imagine their excitement when you tell them that they are going to have the chance to grow their own pumpkins.

Photo: Max Pixel

Pumpkin season might be a little ways off but that does not mean that you should not be preparing yourself anyway. In fact, the prime time to plant is right now!

According to AGRILIFE TODAY, Russ Wallace, Ph.D., Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service vegetable specialist, explained:

“The best time of year to plant pumpkins is from early May through June, but it also depends on the variety to be grown. Some varieties mature in 85 days while others may not mature for 120 days. So those with 120 days to harvest should be planted early.”

Photo: pxfuel

You’ll also want to check on the specific requirements for your general region. In addition to choosing the right time of year, gardeners will need to make sure that they provide the proper drainage. That means that you’ll need to take the time to learn more about the soil in your area, according to Wallace.

“Pumpkins can grow on any soil that has good drainage. In the High Plains pumpkins are generally grown on sandy loams to clay loams. If grown on sandier soils they will require more irrigation,” he said. Organic matter, like compost and peat moss, will help the drainage process if you are in a location where this is a problem.

Photo: PXHERE

Last but not last, irrigation is a common concern. “Pumpkins require about 25-30 inches of rain plus irrigation,” Wallace went on to say. “They need most of their water when the fruit is developing/maturing. If water is not uniformly applied while fruit is maturing, the ends of the pumpkins may not fully develop. We see that a lot in high heat, drought conditions.”

Are you growing pumpkins this year? Let us know!

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