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How To Make Natural Easter Egg Dye

The dyes can be easily created using simple household ingredients in your spice rack or fridge.

With Easter right around the corner, we’re probably starting to think of decorations, etc. Even though this year will be a low-key event as we’re still facing a global pandemic, that doesn’t mean we can’t still get creative at home. And if you’re looking to do something extra fun with your eggs, why not dye them at home?

If you’re thinking about coloring your eggs for a more fun decoration/table display, then you’ll be happy to know it’s not hard at all. In fact, most of the dyes used can be easily created using simple household ingredients in your spice rack or fridge.

Photo: pxhere

Here is the whole ingredients and supplies list for what you’ll need to make naturally dyed eggs:

Hard-boiled eggs
Large wide-mouth jar, like a mason jar.

When naturally dyeing Easter eggs, the tinting may vary depending on the ingredients used and how long you allow the eggs to soak for. The longer you let the eggs soak, the more vibrant the colors will turn out, which is why it is recommended that you soak them overnight and don’t crowd the mason jars too much – depending on the size of the jars, you can fit two to six eggs in per jar.

Photo: flickr/~ tOkKa

Here are the directions for the colors:

Bluish-Gray: Smash up 1 cup of frozen blueberries then mix with 1 cup water. Let the mixture sit at room temperate until the water becomes colored. Strain all the berry bits before adding in the hard-boiled eggs.

Photo: Pixabay

Blue: If you are using red cabbage to dye your eggs then beware – they will turn out blue! If blue eggs is what you are going for, then chop up some red cabbage and add to 4 cups of boiling water. Stir in 2 tablespoons of vinegar into the mixture then leave it to cool at room temperature. Strain cabbage before adding eggs.

Photo: pixy

Jade Green: Remove the skin from 6 red onions before adding them to a pot filled with two cups of simmering water. Let it simmer for 15 minutes and then strain, then add 3 teaspoons of white vinegar.

Photo: pixy

Faint Green-Yellow: Remove the skin of 6 yellow apples. Simmer in 1-1/2 cups water for 20 minutes before straining. Mix in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. Simmer 4 ounces chopped fennel tops in 1-1/2 cups of water for 20 minutes and strain, then mix in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar.

Photo: pxhere

Orange: Peel 6 yellow onions and simmer in 2 cups water for 15 minutes before straining. Add in 3 teaspoons of white vinegar. The longer you let the eggs soak in the mixture, the darker the color will be.

Photo: pxhere

Faint Red-Orange: Add 2 tablespoons of paprika to 1 cup boiling water, and then add 2 teaspoons of white vinegar.

Photo: PIXNIO

Yellow: There are various shades of yellow which can be achieved through various means. For a rich yellow tone, simmer 4 ounces of chopped carrot tops in 1-1/2 cups water for 15 minutes and then strain before adding 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. If you want a more mustard-yellow hue, then add 2 tablespoons of turmeric into 1 cup of boiling water before adding in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. If you want a generic yellow, take four bags of either chamomile or green tea and steep in 1 cup of boiling water for five minutes. For a more pale shade of yellow, chop up 4 ounces of goldenrod and simmer in 2 cups water for 20 minutes, then strain. After, add in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. And for a faint hint of yellow, simmer 6 orange peels in 1-1/2 cups water for 20 minutes before straining and adding 2 teaspoons of vinegar.

Photo: Pixabay

Brown-Gold: Simmer 2 tablespoons of dill seed in 1 cup water for 15 minutes. Strain and stir in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar.

Photo: Pixabay

Brown: Add 1 tablespoon of vinegar to 1 cup of coffee.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Pink: There are several shades of pink that can be achieved through various means. Faint pink can be achieved by cutting up 4 ounces of amaranth flowers and simmering in 2 cups of water. Strain and mix in 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. Alternatively, you can simmer 6 avocado skins in 1-1/2 cup water for 20 minutes, then strain and add 2 teaspoons of white vinegar. For a more medium pink, combine 1 cup pickled beet juice with 1 tablespoon vinegar. For dark pink chop 1 medium beet and add to 4 cups boiling water. Stir in 2 tablespoons of vinegar and let cool to room temperature before removing the beets. It should be noted that the longer the eggs stay in the beet juice dye, the darker they will become.

Photo: Piqsels

Lavender: Mix 1 cup of grape juice with 1 tablespoon vinegar.

Photo: Pixabay

Teal: First, soak your eggs in the blue dye made from red cabbage before putting them to soak in the yellow dye made using turmeric.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Once complete, all these eggs can be stored safely in your refrigerator for up to a week until you’re ready to put them out. Are you going to dye your Easter eggs? Let us know!